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20111201
20111231
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CSPAN 7
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2011 2:00pm EST
between turkey and saudi arabia and the stakes in iran of the current government in syria falls apart. this is about 90 minutes. good afternoon. i run the middle east program at the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. welcome to today's meeting and knees or allies in the new middle east -- turkey, iran, and saudi arabia. this meeting is part of an ongoing series of meetings we have had for a whole year since the beginning of the revolution in tunisia, egypt, libya, and yemen and also the ongoing events in syria and bahrain. our speakers today include a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center and former cairo bureau chief for the washington post. we have the biographies of the speakers distributed, so i will be very brief. david's last paper as part of our occasional paper series was saudi arabia in that shadow of the arab revolt. we have a few copies still left. i would urge you to pick one on your way out. our second speaker is a former fellow at the wilson center. he is a professor of international relations at lehigh university. i just received a copy of his lates
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2011 1:00am EST
for you on the region. in syria you have called for president assaad to step down over the killings of his people, but prime minister maliki has warned that that could lead to civil war that could destabilize the whole region. do you think they could be speaking of iran's influence in this area. speaking of iran, do you think it will be able to weaken the u.s. intelligence because of information from the drone. prime minister, why haven't you demanded that assaad step down given the slaughter of his people? >> first of all, the prime minister and i discussed syria. we share the view that when the syrian people are being killed, or are unable to express themselves, that is a problem. there's no disagreement there. i have expressed my outrage in how the syrian regime has been operating. i do believe that president assaad missed an opportunity to reform his government. he chose the path of repression and has continued to engage in repressive tactics, so that his credibility, his capacity to regain legitimacy in syria is deeply eroded. it is not an easy situation. i expressed to prime minister
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2011 8:00pm EST
questions for you on the region. in syria, you have called for president assad to step down over the killing of his people, but prime minister maliki has warned that assad's removal could lead to a civil war that could destabilize the whole region. i'm wondering if you're worried that iraq could be succumbing to iran's influence on this matter and perhaps helping to protect assad. and speaking of iran, are you concerned that it will be able to weaken america's national security by discovering intelligence from the fallen drone that it captured? prime minister maliki, i'd like to ask you the question about syria. why haven't you demanded that assad step down, given the slaughter of his people? >> first of all, the prime minister and i discussed syria, and we share the view that when the syrian people are being killed or are unable to express themselves, that's a problem. there's no disagreement there. i have expressed my outrage in how the syrian regime has been operating. i do believe that president assad missed an opportunity to reform his government, chose the path of repression, and has c
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2011 6:00am EST
why we saw what happened in libya and what is unfolding right now in syria? it did not exactly stick to the model. this in turn gets you into a variety of factors that have to do with the nature of society, the demography, sectarian divide, leadership, past experiences, and willingness to use force to suppress and kill their own people, which clearly the military who worked for mubarak were not prepared to do. we are seeing a very different side of things in syria. i would be a little wary about trying to computerized assessments of how leaders and political elites would respond to a large crowds. >> in general, it seems to me -- peter's cautions are well-taken, but what strikes me when i did this work looking at the various agencies, there is surprisingly little use of dematha and technology now in most intelligence analysis -- method and technology. there is data that is available, not definitive, but if you are trying to see patterns, and cover old patterns, remember hypotheses you have forgotten, making much more use of methods and computers is important, but it does not give you
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2011 8:00pm EST
clinging to power in syria. though the pressure against it is increasing dramatically each day. i want to condemn in the strongest possible termsthe assad regime's murder and torture of children that the un reported this week in geneva. deservedlyduct has brought scorn and pressure and punishing sanctions, not just by the united states and europe, but now by the arab league and turkey as well. continuedn,iran's drive to develop nuclear capabilities including troubling enrichment activities and past work on what the position that has now been documented by the iaea and its continued support to groups like hezbollah, hamas, and other terrorist organizations make clear that the regime in tehran remains a very grave threat for all of us. all this of people, all of this of people -- of people -- upheavel is causing new challenges for israel in the region very in this time of understandable anxiety, i would like to underscore one thing -- that has stayed constant over the past three years of this administration -- the determination of the united states to safeguard israel's security and that
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2011 1:00am EST
and also the ongoing events in syria. and bahrain. our speakers today are david ottaway, he is a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center and the former cairo euro chief -- chief for the washington post. i will be brief. david, the last paper, as part of our occasional series, was saudi arabia in the shadow of the arab revolt. we have a few copies left outside. we urge you to take one on your way out. our second speaker is a former fellow at the wilson center. he is a professor of international relations at the university. i just received a copy of his latest book, "iraq: its neighbors." witchy added. -- which he edited. our next speaker is the president of the national iranian-american consul. the former public policy scholar at the wilson center in on his upcoming book, a single roll of the dice. it will come out in the new year. we have planned a book talk for mr. parsi in february. i think i will stop here and ask each of our speakers to speak for 15 minutes so we have enough time for a discussion. there is overflow in the fourth floor. we will take questions in writing. david, y
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)